If you are receiving social security disability benefits there are many things you must report to social security. Any kind of earnings or income from work, as well as any changes in work, must be reported to your local social security office.

Those on social security disability are required to report all new income and/or changes work activity, including earnings from wages, self-employment or both, work starting or stopping, amount of pay or hours of work changing, and payments for items needed for work due to a disability, including medications, co-pays, devices, wheelchairs, therapy, and transportation costs.

Other income that must be reported includes workers compensation, sick pay, vacation pay, and pensions not covered by social security. You must report how often you receive these payments, and if they change or stop.

Even if you are only working a few hours a week, or are just making a small amount of money, it is crucial to share this information with social security disability. Your disability attorney will advise you to be up front about changes that must be reported, as failing to report properly could lead to charges of fraud, something neither you nor your social security disability attorney want to see! You may also need to pay back any overpayments, even if they were inadvertent, so speak to your disability attorney about any changes you feel you may need to report.

In 2015, substantial gainful activity thresholds increased. For non-blind individuals engaging in substantial gainful activity, the limit is now $1,090 a month, and for blind individuals engaging in substantial gainful activity, it is $1,820. For the trial work period (TWP), when an individual is attempting to return to the work force, the threshold has increased from $770 a month to $780.

If you go over the substantial gainful activity amount, you may no longer be considered disabled under social security disability standards and your benefits could quickly cease to exist.

In all cases where you may have changes to report, it is important to discuss any questions or concerns with your disability attorney. A social security disability lawyer is experienced and qualified to know what changes must be reported, so he or she can advise you accordingly so you can stay on the correct side of the law.