In the event that you have been injured on the job, you may be wondering what rights and obligations you have. Getting legal advice from a Arizona workers compensation lawyer is the best way to fully understand your situation through the lens of the law, but there are a few basics you should know that can help you get started.

If you are injured at work, your employer may send you to a specific doctor. If you are questioning whether your employer is able to do so, the short answer is yes. A workers compensation lawyer will tell you that an employer can send an injured employee to a physician of their choice, for a one time evaluation and periodically thereafter as appropriate.

Once you have made that one time visit, you are able to determine what comes next. You can return to that specific doctor, or you can switch to one you choose on your own.

There are some exceptions to this rule, for a self-insured employer complying with A.R.S. § 23-1070, through which that employer is providing medical, surgical and hospital care directly to employees. If your employer is self-insured, they may have the right to tell you which doctor you must see, on an ongoing basis. If you think this situation may apply to you, it is very important to seek legal advice so you can fully understand what your employer can request of you.

If you are able to choose your own doctor following the first visit, you may wish to visit a physician who is experienced in workers compensation and workplace injury situations, as the billing process can be different from a typical non-workplace injury situation. Ask your doctor about his or her experience with workplace injuries and workers compensation.

Workers compensation law can be very complex, and you may find yourself overwhelmed trying to figure out where to start, adding to the trauma of your injury. If you are injured at work, whether or not your employer is asking you to visit a specific doctor, you should seek out legal advice from a workers compensation lawyer. He or she can ensure you are treated fairly and appropriately throughout the process, protecting your legal rights and making sure your employer is meeting legal requirements, too.